I just read this yesterday. I think it is marvelous…

LUMEN GENTIUM — DOGMATIC CONSTITUTION ON THE CHURCH
— CHAPTER VII —
THE ESCHATOLOGICAL NATURE OF THE PILGRIM CHURCH
AND ITS UNION WITH THE CHURCH IN HEAVEN

48. The Church, to which we are all called in Christ Jesus, and in which we acquire sanctity through the grace of God, will attain its full perfection only in the glory of heaven, when there will come the time of the restoration of all things.(237) At that time the human race as well as the entire world, which is intimately related to man and attains to its end through him, will be perfectly reestablished in Christ.(238)

Christ, having been lifted up from the earth has drawn all to Himself.(239) Rising from the dead(240) He sent His life-giving Spirit upon His disciples and through Him has established His Body which is the Church as the universal sacrament of salvation. Sitting at the right hand of the Father, He is continually active in the world that He might lead men to the Church and through it join them to Himself and that He might make them partakers of His glorious life by nourishing them with His own Body and Blood. Therefore the promised restoration which we are awaiting has already begun in Christ, is carried forward in the mission of the Holy Spirit and through Him continues in the Church in which we learn the meaning of our terrestrial life through our faith, while we perform with hope in the future the work committed to us in this world by the Father, and thus work out our salvation.(241)

Already the final age of the world has come upon us (242) and the renovation of the world is irrevocably decreed and is already anticipated in some kind of a real way; for the Church already on this earth is signed with a sanctity which is real although imperfect. However, until there shall be new heavens and a new earth in which justice dwells,(243) the pilgrim Church in her sacraments and institutions, which pertain to this present time, has the appearance of this world which is passing and she herself dwells among creatures who groan and travail in pain until now and await the revelation of the sons of God.(244)

Joined with Christ in the Church and signed with the Holy Spirit “who is the pledge of our inheritance”,(245) truly we are called and we are sons of God(246) but we have not yet appeared with Christ in glory,(247) in which we shall be like to God, since we shall see Him as He is.(248) And therefore “while we are in the body, we are exiled from the Lord (249) and having the first-fruits of the Spirit we groan within ourselves(250) and we desire to be with Christ”‘.(251) By that same charity however, we are urged to live more for Him, who died for us and rose again.(252) We strive therefore to please God in all things(253) and we put on the armor of God, that we may be able to stand against the wiles of the devil and resist in the evil day.(254) Since however we know not the day nor the hour, on Our Lord’s advice we must be constantly vigilant so that, having finished the course of our earthly life,(255) we may merit to enter into the marriage feast with Him and to be numbered among the blessed(256) and that we may not be ordered to go into eternal fire(257) like the wicked and slothful servant,(258) into the exterior darkness where “there will be the weeping and the gnashing of teeth”.(259) For before we reign with Christ in glory, all of us will be made manifest “before the tribunal of Christ, so that each one may receive what he has won through the body, according to his works, whether good or evil”(260) and at the end of the world “they who have done good shall come forth unto resurrection of life; but those who have done evil unto resurrection of judgment”.(261) Reckoning therefore that “the sufferings of the present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory to come that will be revealed in us”,(262) strong in faith we look for the “blessed hope and the glorious coming of our great God and Saviour, Jesus Christ”(263) “who will refashion the body of our lowliness, conforming it to the body of His glory(264). and who will come “to be glorified in His saints and to be marveled at in all those who have believed”(265).

References:
237 Acts 3, 21.
238 Cf Eph. 1, 1O; Col. 1, 20; 2 3, 10-13.
239 Cf. Jn. 12, 32.
240 cf. Rom. 6, 9.
241 Cf. Phil. 2, 12.
242 Cf 1 Cor. 10. 11.
243 Cf. 2. Pet. 3, 13.
244 Cf. Rom. 8, 19-22.
245 Eph. 1, 14.
246 Cf. 1 Jn. 3, 1.
247 Cf. Col- 3. 4
248 Cf. 1 Jn. 3, 2
249 2 Cor. 5, 6.
250 Cf. Rom. 8, 23.
251 Cf. Phil. 1. 23.
252 Cf. 2 Cor 5, 15.
253 Cf. 2 Cor. 5, 9.
254 Cf.Eph.6, 11-13.
255 Cf. Heb 9, 27.
256 Cf. Mt. 25, 31-46.
257 Cf. Mt. 25, 41.
258 Cf. Mt. 25, 26.
259 Mt. 22, 13 and 25. 30.
260 2 Cor. 5, 10.
261 Jn. 5, 29; Cf. Matt. 25, 46.
262 Ram. 8, 18; cf. 2 Tim. 2, 11-12.
263 Tit. 2, 13.
264 Phil. 3, 21.
265 2 Thess. 1, 10.

When it comes to understanding Catholic theology I am a true neophyte, a certified numskull. FYI. But I’m loving what I’m reading so far.

Well, I’ve begun reading the documents of the Second Vatican Council. Perhaps, in a way, I am reading these documents in light of the Year of Faith, which I find a great idea and something I hope brings about genuine and organic renewal—something we all need.

The Second Vatican Council seems to be such an important event of the last century, profoundly influential on so many levels, and still very much alive in some important sense. And it’s importance, especially regarding it ecumenical focus, is relevant for Protestants as well as for Catholics. Along with the documents, which are themselves marvelous (as far as I can tell so far), I find the council a source of interest because of the great individuals who participated both in and after the council. This look at the council by Fr. Robert Barron is fascinating:

Look who was at the council:

A young Ratzinger and Yves Congar at Vatican II
Cardinal Joseph Frings and a young Ratziner at Vatican II

Here’s another take on the significance of the council:

I am curious if there is a difference, generally speaking, in evaluations of the council and it’s impacts by those in Europe and those in the U.S.

I am no scholar, and in many ways I feel overwhelmed by the vastness of the council. I also am looking from the “outside” in that I am not a Catholic—not yet anyway. Maybe what’s so interesting about the council is just how immense and human it was. This was a council in touch with its times and actively transparent (up to a point) in a way unlike previous councils.

The following is a great overview and perspective on the council by Rev. John W. O’Malley:

I don’t know much about Fr. O’Malley, he may be in one of those two “camps” spoken of by Fr. Barron, and it seems he may be more in the concilium camp than the communio camp—for me, at this time, the communio camp stirs my heart more, but I know very little of each. However, his last comment, which was his answer to the question of where is his hope, he says, “In the living God.” That, I think, is really the key.

We Christians like to speak of a “personal relationship with Jesus.” We often like to think of Jesus as our friend, our buddy, our confidant. Modern evangelism tends to avoid bringing up the awfulness of hell anymore as a motivator to become a Christian (we make fun of fire-and-brimstone preachers), rather the emphasis is placed squarely on the positive relationship aspects of salvation. “Do you have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ?” “Come to Jesus!” There must be many ways to think about this, but I believe in general we tend to produce an image in our heads of Jesus as our friend. Jesus loves us, he even died for us, but is friendship the best way to think about our relationship with him? Is he our friend or is he our lord?

Are Jesus and you on a roadtrip together, or are you doing his will? Is my relationship with Jesus more like having coffee with a friend or more like coming before the throne of a king?

A great many Protestant/Evangelical church services revolve around creating the feelings of having a personal relationship with Jesus; a kind of emotional high that evokes heartfelt emotions and supposedly “recharges one’s spiritual batteries” for Monday. That seems to be the job function of what is often called the “worship team.” Churches that are most successful at creating those feelings tend to grow big and become financially rich. Apart from the fact that, though Jesus does truly exist, the “Jesus” we claim to know is largely one of our imaginations; and apart from the clearly manufactured and manipulated emotional elements of many of these church services, a question still remains: Do we have the right kind of relationship in mind when we claim a personal relationship with Jesus?

I cannot imagine anyone having a more clear understanding of a “personal relationship with Jesus” than his apostles, except, of course, his mother. If this is true, then I am struck by these two verses:

One of his disciples, whom Jesus loved, was lying close to the breast of Jesus; (John 13:23)

And when I saw Him, I fell at His feet as dead.  (Revelation 1:17a)

The first takes place during the upper room discourse prior to Christ’s crucifixion.  John the apostle leans back against Jesus. There is a closeness, an intimacy, a personal relationship going on there. Of course all the apostles had a personal relationship with Jesus, for they walked with him, ate with him, boarded with him, and were taught directly by him. But the intimacy with John wonderfully contrasts with John’s response at seeing the risen Christ in his vision of Heaven. Here John turns and sees Jesus in his glory. What is John’s response? He falls at Christ’s feet as dead. John is an apostle, one with a close and intimate relationship with Jesus, but now he is falling down in profound reverence at the feet of his lord—as though his very life depended on it.

Is it better to approach the throne of Christ standing up because one is confident in one’s “standing” before him, or to fall down before him as though dead, only to have him then raise one up to standing saying, “be not afraid”?

We know that God loves us. We know that Jesus gave his life for us. We know that the Holy Spirit, sent by the Father and the Son, works intimately on our hearts. But can we say that we have a personal relationship with Jesus as though he is our friend, our buddy, our warm fuzzy? Perhaps John saw Jesus as a kind of “big brother” buddy when they were walking around Galilee, but that obviously changed once Christ rose in glory. If John fell down at Christ’s feet as though dead, what should be our response to Christ? Are we willing to accept a Christianity that, perhaps, gives us not so much a friend as a lord? I know I have rarely exhibited the kind of reverence and service due to Christ.

What if we discover that Jesus doesn’t care all that much if we have warm fuzzy feelings toward him, rather that he wants us to keep his commands: to feed the hungry, help the poor, the orphans , the widows, to be a unified church, to submit to the authority of the apostles (and their successors), and to participate in the corporeal and tangible activities that God gave us to sanctify us, that is, those gifts known as the sacraments? Is not this the right kind of relationship? Can we live with that?

If so, what would this then look like? How would this affect our lives, our relationships, our sanity? And how would this affect our worship, or perhaps, how should this affect the way we “do church”? Might “church” then look less like a Protestant/Evangelical/emotional worship service and more like a solemn Catholic (or perhaps Orthodox) mass? (This is not to say that Catholics shouldn’t get a bit more evangelical in spirit as well.) Does the Eucharist (with Christ being really present) and the serving of others constitute our true personal relationship with Christ, and the rest being, perhaps, merely imagination and emotion? If we are the body of Christ then is not our unity some indication of our relationship with Jesus, who is the head of the Church, and our disunity a sign of a poor relationship with the head? If this is so, then to be Protestant must require answering the question every day, “Why am I still Protestant?” We should have a very good reason, for the implications of disunity are too great not to take this seriously; the implications of being comfortable and unquestioning in the “breakaway churches” might be very grave indeed.  And if I don’t have a good answer am I then willing to admit the seriousness of my situation? If I am not Protestant, but rather some vague evangelical who just “loves Jesus”, am I capable of admitting the serious of my situation?

I ask because I don’t know. But I have my suspicions.

The following is a prayer from Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 -1274). Perhaps this prayer should be said by every teacher or tutor before class begins:

O creator past all telling,
you have appointed from the treasures of your wisdom
the hierarchies of angels,
disposing them in wondrous order
above the bright heavens,
and have so beautifully set out all parts of the universe.

You we call the true fount of wisdom
and the noble origin of all things.
Be pleased to shed
on the darkness of mind in which I was born,
The twofold beam of your light
and warmth to dispel my ignorance and sin.

You make eloquent the tongues of children.
Then instruct my speech
and touch my lips with graciousness.
Make me keen to understand, quick to learn,
able to remember;
make me delicate to interpret and ready to speak.

Guide my going in and going forward,
lead home my going forth.
You are true God and true man,
and live for ever and ever.

The prayer that was prayed at the beginning of Vatican II:

We are here before You, O Holy Spirit, conscious of our innumerable sins, but united in a special way in Your Holy Name. Come and abide with us. Deign to penetrate our hearts.

Be the guide of our actions, indicate the path we should take, and show us what we must do so that, with Your help, our work may be in all things pleasing to You.

May You be our only inspiration and the overseer of our intentions, for You alone possess a glorious name together with the Father and the Son.

May You, who are infinite justice, never permit that we be disturbers of justice. Let not our ignorance induce us to evil, nor flattery sway us, nor moral and material interest corrupt us. But unite our hearts to You alone, and do it strongly, so that, with the gift of Your grace, we may be one in You and may nothing depart from the truth.

Thus, united in Your name, may we in our every action follow the dictates of Your mercy and justice, so that today and always our judgments may not be alien to You and in eternity we may obtain the unending reward of our actions. Amen.

This prayer was composed by St. Isidore of Seville, to be used during the Second Provincial Council of Seville, Spain, in 619. It was also used during the Fourth Provincial Council of Toledo, Spain, in 633. With this prayer the sessions of the First Vatican Council began in 1869. It was said in Latin before every morning meeting of the preparatory commissions and conciliar commissions of Vatican II.

I cannot think of a better or more beautiful prayer for a beginning.

Found it here.

It is easy to romanticize religion or religious experience, only to find it all too mundane. On the other hand, one might embrace the mundane and discover something truly romantic. The first is the repeatable romantic experience; high hopes brought low, longings dashed, experiences become hollow. The second is the realist vision: it is in the ordinary one finds Heaven. I think Tolkien, for all his brilliant fantasies of Middle Earth, was at heart a realist who discovered the truly romantic in the mundane. And it is the mundane world of ordinary communion that often has the deepest roots. As Tolkien says below, “The only cure for sagging or fainting faith is Communion.”

The following is a letter Tolkien wrote to his son:

Out of the darkness of my life, so much frustrated, I put before you the one great thing to love on earth: the Blessed Sacrament… There you will find romance, glory, honour, fidelity, and the true way of all your loves on earth, and more than that: Death. By the divine paradox, that which ends life, and demands the surrender of all, and yet by the taste -or foretaste- of which alone can what you seek in your earthly relationships (love, faithfulness, joy) be maintained, or take on that complexion of reality, of eternal endurance, which every man’s heart desires.

The only cure for sagging or fainting faith is Communion. Though always Itself, perfect and complete and inviolate, the Blessed Sacrament does not operate completely and once for all in any of us. Like the act of Faith it must be continuous and grow by exercise. Frequency is of the highest effect. Seven times a week is more nourishing than seven times at intervals.

Also I can recommend this as an exercise (alas! only too easy to find opportunity for): make your communion in circumstances that affront your taste. Choose a snuffling or gabbling priest or a proud and vulgar friar; and a church full of the usual bourgeois crowd, ill-behaved children – from those who yell to those products of Catholic schools who the moment the tabernacle is opened sit back and yawn – open necked and dirty youths, women in trousers and often with hair both unkempt and uncovered. Go to communion with them (and pray for them). It will be just the same (or better than that) as a mass said beautifully by a visibly holy man, and shared by a few devout and decorous people. It could not be worse than the mess of the feeding of the Five Thousand – after which our Lord propounded the feeding that was to come.

The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien, Letter to his son.

He had me at: “Out of the darkness of my life, so much frustrated…” I look forward to meeting him someday.

And Isaac said to his father Abraham, “My father!” And he said, “Here am I, my son.” He said, “Behold, the fire and the wood; but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?” Abraham said, “God will provide himself the lamb for a burnt offering, my son.”

God will provide himself the lamb for a burnt offering

God will provide himself the lamb

provide himself the lamb

himself the lamb

himself    the    lamb

…and he looked at Jesus as he walked, and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!”

I am coming to believe in the Catholic doctrine of apostolic succession. This is a radical break from my Protestant/Reformed background.

A theme running through much of Protestantism is the desire to “get back” to the Apostolic Church, that is, the beginning. The apostles (especially Paul) are a big deal to Protestants, which is good. The idea that animates this theme of getting back to the beginning is a belief in an assumed purity that must have existed in the early Church, and which was increasingly corrupted as the Church got caught up in the worldly machinations of politics, Greek philosophy, paganism, arcane theological debates, bureaucracy, etc. Getting back, however, is usually not seen as a pure imitation of looking like those early Christians (who had many flaws anyway), rather it is usually a desire to get back to a pure understanding of what the apostles taught. This is a good thing, but it is difficult and typically (since the Reformation) has included an unqualified rejection of all tradition of the historical church—at least by Fundamentalists. Stripping away all supposed encumbrances of “religion” (as understood by Christians today) is at the very heart of sola scriptura and/or radical biblicism. Still, it is important not to try and “read” the hearts of individuals too closely; there are many reasons one may be a radical biblicist.

The idea is this: One cannot have the necessary freedom to be committed to sola scriptura if one is under a historical, successive, hierarchical, and dogmatic authority. Sola scriptura is antithetical to the magisterium and papal authority, and even tradition. Thus, apostolic succession (whereby the bishops get their authority handed down to them) stands in the way of sola scriptura, which means it stands in the way of the truth—or the possibility of coming to the truth. One must be free of authority, and in particular, specifically, and unequivocally, Catholic authority. Ironically, in much of Protestantism most pastors become a mini-popes, claiming their own authority to teach the scriptures, lead their flocks, and run their churches their way.

[Note: It was once said that printing the Bible in the vernacular made every man a pope—anyone could interpret as they wished, etc. The reality is that the average Christian looks to their pastor for interpretation, not to themselves, and pastors are typically only too willing to accept that responsibility. In this sense, and unfortunately, all too many pastors desire their pulpit for similar reasons that politicians desire their office.]

Anyway, that need for freedom is a perspective taught me by my Baptist church when I was young, and the perspective other churches I have attended. The basic idea is that the Reformation (which seems to me to have became more of a rebellion, uninterested in reforming the Church it ultimately despised, than a true reformation) sought to recover the authentic Apostolic Church, as though the Catholic Church had no interest in being genuinely, authentically Apostolic—and the Eastern Churches were essentially forgotten and thus not on the Protestant radar. In Reformed parlance, to get back to the early church, to be truly apostolic, is to reject the idea of apostolic succession. Interestingly, ever since the Reformation this theme (any many others) has grown and morphed until popular Christianity now no longer looks like the Church of the Reformers, and ironically, looks nothing like the Church of the Apostles from what I can tell.

And yet, I like the Protestant desire to get back to the basics, to recall the era of the earliest Church, and to be truly Apostolic. And certainly I agree that we should always have the highest regard for the teachings of the apostles—not just that we like them the most, but that we regard them as the highest.

But I am curious about Apostolic tradition. What is it that the Apostles established? How was it passed on? Do we still have, or follow, their tradition today? The Catholic and Orthodox Churches both claim Apostolic tradition—they claim that they do go back to the apostles, and have remained true to their teaching. Protestants don’t like the word tradition, so each (that is, each of the many thousands of Protestant denominations) claim something like the purity of the Gospel as against the traditions of other churches (Catholic, Orthodox, and other Protestant churches). In other words it is authentic apostolic Christianity versus the traditions of men. And yet, anyone who has even slightly questioned the teaching of their Baptist or fundamentalist preacher has learned quickly the Protestant tradition of every preacher a pope. (Catch a typical Protestant pastor misusing the Greek—because he knows his congregation doesn’t read Greek—and one is like to get a dismissive response, and even be belittled. Fortunately there are still some pastors and Bible teachers with real humility and grace.)

I wonder if the apostles would look at modern evangelicalism or fundamentalism and scratch their heads. Would they ask, “But where’s the church of Jesus Christ, the one he founded? Who’s in charge here? Where are your bishops?” Most Protestants would say the apostles would ask nothing of the sort. I am beginning to think otherwise. I am beginning to think that if a typical Protestant could time-travel back to the time of the apostles and early Church the response would be something like, “Oops.”

With all this in mind, I have sought to know what the Catholic church teaches. I am just beginning my study of this topic. The following quotes are taken from the Catechism of the Catholic Church. I have inserted my thoughts throughout.

I. The Apostolic Tradition

75 “Christ the Lord, in whom the entire Revelation of the most high God is summed up, commanded the apostles to preach the Gospel, which had been promised beforehand by the prophets, and which he fulfilled in his own person and promulgated with his own lips. In preaching the Gospel, they were to communicate the gifts of God to all men. This Gospel was to be the source of all saving truth and moral discipline.”

My thoughts: Here we have one primary focus, that is, the Gospel. To be “apostolic” is to be about the Gospel. For us moderns, when we seek to live within the apostolic tradition, to have our churches be apostolic (which is a popular idea for Protestant churches seeking to break free from perceived impositions of the Christian “religion”), is to be about the fundamental message of Christ. Thus, to be apostolic is not to be about the apostles per se, rather it is to be all about the Gospel, which was fulfilled in Christ. The apostolic tradition begins thus with Christ. However, to be all about Christ does not preclude organization, structure, or even institutionalization. Because Christ and His Gospel are before and beyond (though not apart from) all structures and institutionalizations,  man can thus follow, in freedom, his natural and necessary requirements for liturgy, hierarchy, structure, authority, repetition, organization, community, praxis, responsibility, and sacrifice. These are not impediments to being apostolic, rather they are the extension of our humanity, our imageness, extending outward into the world and working inward upon us such that we are encouraged in our faith and drawn close to God. The apostolic tradition, while offering a picture of beginnings, perhaps even suggesting a kind of purity of faith, nonetheless established the proper foundation for the historical and visible Church, which is the mystical body of Christ extending into and through the creation.

In the apostolic preaching. . .

76 In keeping with the Lord’s command, the Gospel was handed on in two ways:

  • orally “by the apostles who handed on, by the spoken word of their preaching, by the example they gave, by the institutions they established, what they themselves had received—whether from the lips of Christ, from his way of life and his works, or whether they had learned it at the prompting of the Holy Spirit”;
  • in writing “by those apostles and other men associated with the apostles who, under the inspiration of the same Holy Spirit, committed the message of salvation to writing”.

My thoughts: Christ lived his Gospel, teaching it through his actions, including the cross. Christ spoke his gospel through direct and indirect language (stories and parables). Christ sent the Holy Spirit so that the Gospel would be both understood and take root in the hearts those who believed. Some of this—Christ’s actions, Christ’s words, and evidence of the work of the Holy Spirit—was written down for the early Church and for all of us who have come later. We can presume most of it was not written down, rather it was passed on through the teaching of the apostles and others, and through the practices they established. This is exactly the kind of human, historical situation that would establish traditions of teaching and worship in order to promote and preserve the Gospel. To assume the early Church was incapable or uninterested in maintaining the purity of orthodoxy and orthopraxy is far fetched. To imagine the Holy Spirit was incapable or uninterested in building and sustaining the Church from the beginning until now seems like foolishness. For a Bible teacher to assume theological darkness befell the Church after it first century, only to catch the first rays of light again in the 16th century, is potentially to warrant suspicion in all that he teaches.

. . . continued in apostolic succession

77 “In order that the full and living Gospel might always be preserved in the Church the apostles left bishops as their successors. They gave them their own position of teaching authority.” Indeed, “the apostolic preaching, which is expressed in a special way in the inspired books, was to be preserved in a continuous line of succession until the end of time.”

My thoughts: I think of the founding fathers of the United States of America. What they gave to us was a government not only a document. If they had only written the Constitution, but did not establish a government to live out that document and keep it preserved and alive, then all would have been chaos. Scripture tells us that God establishes rulers. Some rulers are good and some are bad, but to be ruled is as much a necessity of being human as is freedom. They go together. Perhaps to elevate scriptures over the Church is to show disinterest in Christ’s teaching and desires about His Church. It is also to open the Christian life to institutional chaos, diminish the ability for unity, and potentially distort the Gospel. This is the Protestant legacy.

Clearly the Scriptures are given to us in order to help secure right thinking about God. But it seems equally as clear that Jesus was and is more interested in his Church, in the love and unity of his body, than in scriptures; that the scriptures exist in order to help with that love and unity, to serve that love and unity.

Here’s a thought: Could it be that the “I love Jesus but not religion” position be, in fact, against Jesus? If Jesus and his apostles left us the Church, including offices with apostolic authority, and one refuses to accept the reality of those offices, then is not one refusing, in part, to love Jesus—if, at least, we include in loving Jesus the requirement to keep his commandments? Are we disobeying Christ if we refuse his Church (even as we claim to be part of that Church in our “own way”)? I think so—though I recognize the complicated nature of our age with many being educated to refuse the Church. My desire is to love Jesus, to give my life to him, to serve him, and to follow him. I want to believe in the open arms grace of God. But I also know the gate is narrow, and I know many believe God knows them when in fact they will be separated like goats from the sheep. It’s not about hedging my bets, though, but it is an earnest desire to be led and to follow. In fear and trembling… in fear and trembling…

78 This living transmission, accomplished in the Holy Spirit, is called Tradition, since it is distinct from Sacred Scripture, though closely connected to it. Through Tradition, “the Church, in her doctrine, life and worship, perpetuates and transmits to every generation all that she herself is, all that she believes.” “The sayings of the holy Fathers are a witness to the life-giving presence of this Tradition, showing how its riches are poured out in the practice and life of the Church, in her belief and her prayer.”

My thoughts: As I understand it, the Scriptures are to be understood as part of Tradition. Given that there are always the possibilities for many interpretations, it makes sense to consider the legacy of Tradition handed down by the Apostles and the early Church (and the continuing Church) as the means of keeping those interpretations on track. At the same time, the Christian life is not first and foremost about interpretations of Scripture, but of the life of faith lived out in love. Faith, hope, and love, but the greatest is love. It is not the Bible that gives life, it is being in the body of Christ—being part of a living, visible, mystical organism—that gives life. We should venerate the holy Fathers for their love of Christ, and for their love of us as they proved excellent witnesses for us. Perhaps we should see the Church as this big, rich, mysterious outpouring of the Holy Spirit inside and outside time and space, with our burning hearts driving the organism forward, and our curious minds continually enlivened by the fathomless “I AM”, and our souls longing for eternity within the loving gift we call human nature and all that is life giving and speaks to it, such as freedom, tradition, and authority. Perhaps we need to see Holy Scriptures as subservient to all that.

And perhaps one would object, saying that to “lower” the Scriptures, as it were, to being “merely” a part of Tradition is to open the door to abuse. And perhaps the response is to say, “May it never be…” that to know the Church is to know the Holy Spirit and the loving care that has been lavished on the Body of Christ throughout its visible and mystical history.

And perhaps the greatest gifts given to us by Saint Paul are not his epistles, perhaps they are his prayers.

79 The Father’s self-communication made through his Word in the Holy Spirit, remains present and active in the Church: “God, who spoke in the past, continues to converse with the Spouse of his beloved Son. and the Holy Spirit, through whom the living voice of the Gospel rings out in the Church – and through her in the world – leads believers to the full truth, and makes the Word of Christ dwell in them in all its richness.”

My thoughts: By the work of the Holy Spirit we are the Church, the Body of Christ. We choose God only to discover that we have already been chosen. We love to find out that we have already been loved. We also receive the gift of adoption, the gift of faith, the gift of having brothers and sisters, and the gift of the scriptures. We live out the traditions, imperfectly, but with genuine hope. The Spirit has never left the Church, though some, even claiming the name of Christ, have left the Church. And yet God is sovereign. What His plans are, and why the story has gone the ways it has, must be for good. Work out your salvation… for it is God…

Although I have been a Christian all my life, the saints are new to me. I find it intriguing to say the least that millions of Christians venerate saints. This is something I want to learn to do as well.

V. Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy.
R. Christe, eléison. R. Christ, have mercy.
V. Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy.
V. Christe, audi nos. V. O Christ, hear us.
R. Christe, exáudi nos. R. O Christ, graciously hear us.
V. Pater de cælis, Deus. V. O God the Father of heaven.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Fili, Redémptor mundi, Deus. V. O God the Son, Redeemer of the world.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Spíritus Sancte, Deus. V. O God the Holy Ghost.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Sancta Trínitas, unus Deus. V. O Holy Trinity, one God.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Sancta María. V. Holy Mary.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Dei Génetrix. V. Holy Mother of God.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Virgo vírginum. V. Holy Virgin of virgins.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Michael. V. Saint Michael.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Gabriel. V. Saint Gabriel.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Raphael. V. Saint Raphael.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Angeli et Archangeli. V. All ye holy Angels and Archangels.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti beatórum Spírituum ordines. V. All ye holy orders of blessed Spirits.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Joánnes Baptista. V. Saint John the Baptist.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Josephe. V. Saint Joseph.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Patriárchæ et Prophetæ. V. All ye holy Patriarchs and Prophets.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Petre. V. Saint Peter.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Paule. V. Saint Paul.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Andrea. V. Saint Andrew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Jacobe. V. Saint James.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Joánnes. V. Saint John.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Thoma. V. Saint Thomas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Jacobe. V. Saint James.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Philippe. V. Saint Philip.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Bartholomæe. V. Saint Bartholomew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Matthæe. V. Saint Matthew.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Simon. V. Saint Simon.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Thaddæe. V. Saint Jude.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Matthia. V. Saint Matthias.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Barnaba. V. Saint Barnabas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Luca. V. Saint Luke.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Marce. V. Saint Mark.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Apóstoli et Evangelistæ. V. All ye holy Apostles and Evangelists.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Discípuli Dómini. V. All ye holy Disciples of the Lord.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Innocéntes. V. All ye Holy Innocents.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Stephane. V. Saint Stephen.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Laurénti. V. Saint Lawrence.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Vincenti. V. Saint Vincent.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Fabiane et Sebastiane. V. Saint Fabian and Saint Sebastian.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Joánnes et Paule. V. Saint John and Saint Paul.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Cosma et Damiane. V. Saint Cosmas and Saint Damian.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancti Gervasi et Protasi. V. Saint Gervasius and Saint Protasius.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Mártyres. V. All ye holy Martyrs.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Silvester. V. Saint Sylvester.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Gregóri. V. Saint Gregory.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Ambrósi. V. Saint Ambrose.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Augustine. V. Saint Augustine.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Hieronyme. V. Saint Jerome.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Martine. V. Saint Martin.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Nicolaë. V. Saint Nicholas.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Pontifices et Confessores. V. All ye holy Bishops and Confessors.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Doctores. V. All ye holy Doctors.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Antoni. V. Saint Anthony.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Benedicte. V. Saint Benedict.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Bernarde. V. Saint Bernard.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Dominice. V. Saint Dominic.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancte Francisce. V. Saint Francis.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Sacerdótes et Levitæ. V. All ye holy Priests and Levites.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sancti Monachi et Eremitæ. V. All ye holy Monks and Hermits.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta María Magdalena. V. Saint Mary Magdalene.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Agatha. V. Saint Agatha.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Lucia. V. Saint Lucy.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Agnes. V. Saint Agnes.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Cæcilia. V. Saint Cecilia.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Catharina. V. Saint Catherine.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Sancta Anastasia. V. Saint Anastasia.
R. Ora pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes sanctæ Vírgines et Víduæ. V. All ye holy Virgins and Widows.
R. Orate pro nobis. R. Pray for us.
V. Omnes Sancti et Sanctæ Dei. V. All ye Holy, Righteous, and Elect of God.
R. Intercédite pro nobis. R. Intercede for us.
V. Propitius esto. V. Be thou merciful.
R. Parce nobis, Dómine. R. Spare us, Lord.
V. Propitius esto. V. Be thou merciful.
R. Exáudi nos, Dómine. R. Graciously hear us, Lord.
V. Ab omni malo. V. From all evil.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab omni peccáto. V. From all deadly sin.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab ira tua. V. From thine anger.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A subitanea et improvisa morte. V. From sudden and unrepentant death.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab insídiis diaboli. V. From the crafts and assaults of the devil.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Ab ira, et ódio, et omni mala voluntáte. V. From anger, and hatred, and all uncharitableness.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A spíritu fornicatiónis. V. From the spirit of fornication.
R. Líbera nos, Domine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A fulgure et tempestáte. V. From lightning and tempest.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A flagello terræmotus. V. From the peril of earthquake, fire, and flood.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A peste, fame et bello. V. From pestilence, famine, and battle.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. A morte perpetua. V. From everlasting damnation.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per mystérium sanctæ Incarnatiónis tuæ. V. By the mystery of thy Holy Incarnation.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per advéntum tuum. V. By thine Advent.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per nativitátem tuam. V. By thy Nativity.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per baptismum et sanctum jejunium tuum. V. By thy Baptism and holy Fasting.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per crucem et passiónem tuam. V. By thy Cross and Passion.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per mortem et sepultúram tuam. V. By thy precious Death and Burial.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per sanctam resurrectiónem tuam. V. By thy holy Resurrection.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per admirábilem ascensiónem tuam. V. By thy glorious Ascension.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Per advéntum Spíritus Sancti Paracliti. V. By the coming of the Holy Spirit the Comforter.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. In die judícii. V. In the day of judgement.
R. Líbera nos, Dómine. R. Good Lord, deliver us.
V. Peccatóres. V. Even though we be sinners.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nobis parcas. V. That it may please thee to spare us.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nobis indulgeas. V. That it may please thee to pity and pardon us.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ad veram pœniténtiam nos perducere dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give us true repentance.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut Ecclésiam tuam sanctam regere et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to rule and govern thy holy Church.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut domnum Apostolicum et omnes ecclesiásticos ordines in sancta religióne conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to preserve the Apostolic Lord, and to keep all orders of the Church in thy sacred religion.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut inimícos sanctæ Ecclésiæ humiliare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to overthrow the enemies of thy holy Church.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut régibus et princípibus christiánis pacem et veram concordiam donare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to bestow on all Christian kings and princes true peace and concord.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut cuncto pópulo christiáno pacem et unitátem largiri dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give to all Christian nations both peace and unity.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut omnes errántes ad unitátem Ecclésiæ revocare, et infidéles univérsos ad Evangélii lumen perducere dignéris. V. That it may please thee to restore unity to thy Church, and to lead all unbelievers into the light of thy holy Gospel.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nosmetípsos in tuo sancto servítio confortare et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to strengthen and preserve us in true worshipping of thee.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut mentes nostras ad cæléstia desidéria erigas. V. That it may please thee to endue our hearts with heavenly desires.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ómnibus benefactóribus nostris sempitérna bona retríbuas. V. That it may please thee to bestow on all our benefactors thine everlasting benefits.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ánimas nostras, fratrum, propinquorum et benefactórum nostrórum ab ætérna damnatióne erípias. V. That it may please thee to deliver from eternal damnation our souls, and those of our brethren, kindred, and benefactors.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut fructus terræ dare et conservare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to give and preserve to our use the kindly fruits of the earth.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut ómnibus fidelibus defunctis réquiem ætérnam donare dignéris. V. That it may please thee to bestow upon all thy faithful departed rest eternal.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Ut nos exáudire dignéris. V. That it may please thee graciously to hear our prayer.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Fili Dei. V. O Son of God.
R. Te rogamus, audi nos. R. We beseech thee to hear us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Parce nobis, Dómine. R. Spare us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Exáudi nos, Dómine. R. Graciously hear us, Lord.
V. Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccáta mundi. V. O Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world.
R. Miserére nobis. R. Have mercy upon us.
V. Christe, audi nos. V. O Christ, hear us.
R. Christe, exáudi nos. R. O Christ, graciously hear us.
V. Kyrie, eléison. V. Lord, have mercy upon us.
R. Christe, eléison. Kyrie, eléison. R. Christ, have mercy upon us. Lord, have mercy upon us.
Pater noster. (secréto usque ad) Our Father. (Which words are said aloud, and the rest secretly to):
V. Et ne nos indúcas in tentatiónem. V. And lead us not into temptation.
R. Sed líbera nos a malo. R. But deliver us from evil.
Psalmus 69. Deus, in adjutórium Psalm 69. Deus, in adjutórium
1 Deus, in adjutórium meum inténde: * Dómine ad adjuvándum me festína. 1 HASTE thee, O God, to deliver me; * make haste to help me, O LORD.
2 Confundántur et revereántur, * qui quærunt ánimam meam. 2 Let them be ashamed and confounded that seek after my soul; * let them be turned backward and put to confusion that wish me evil.
3 Avertántur retrórsum, et erubéscant, * qui volunt mihi mala. 3 Let them for their reward be soon brought to shame, * that cry over me, There! there!
4 Avertántur statim erubescéntes, * qui dicunt mihi : Euge, euge. 4 But let all those that seek thee be joyful and glad in thee: * and let all such as delight in thy salvation say always, The Lord be praised.
5 Exsúltent et læténtur in te omnes qui quærunt te, * et dicant semper : Magnificétur Dóminus : qui díligunt salutáre tuum. 5 As for me, I am poor and in misery: * haste thee unto me, O God.
6 Ego vero egénus, et pauper sum : * Deus, ádjuva me. 6 Thou art my helper, and my redeemer: * O LORD, make no long tarrying.
7 Adjútor meus, et liberátor meus es tu : * Dómine, ne moréris.
8 Glória Patri, et Fílio, et Spirítui Sancto. 8 Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost.
9 Sicut erat in princípio, et nunc, et semper, * et in sæcula sæculórum. Amen. 9 As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
V. Salvos fac servos tuos. V. O God, save thy servants.
R. Deus meus, sperántes in te. R. That put their trust in thee.
V. Esto nobis, Dómine, turris fortitúdinis. V. Be unto us, O Lord, a tower of strength.
R. A fácie inimíci. R. From the face of the enemy.
V. Nihil profíciat inimícus in nobis. V. Let the enemy prevail nothing against us.
R. Et fílius iniquitátis non appónat nocére nobis. R. Nor the son of wickedness approach to afflict us.
V. Dómine, non secúndum peccáta nostra fácias nobis. V. O Lord, deal not with us after our sins.
R. Neque secúndum iniquitátes nostras retríbuas nobis. R. Neither reward us according to our iniquities.
V. Orémus pro Pontifice nostro (Nomen). V. Let us pray for our Pope (Name).
R. Dóminus consérvet eum, et vivíficet eum, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et beátum fáciat eum in terra, et non tradat eum in ánimam inimicórum ejus. R. The Lord preserve him and keep him alive, that he may be blessed upon earth; and deliver not thou him into the will of his enemies.
(Vacante Apostolica Sede, Versus cum suo Responsorio præteritur.) (If the Holy See is vacant, the above Versicle with its Response is omitted.)
V. Orémus pro benefactóribus nostris. V. Let us pray for our benefactors.
R. Retribúere dignáre, Dómine, ómnibus, nobis bona faciéntibus propter nomen tuum, vitam ætérnam. Amen. R. Vouchsafe, O Lord, for thy Name’s sake, to reward with eternal life all them that do us good. Amen.
V. Orémus pro fidelibus defunctis. V. Let us pray for the faithful departed.
R. Réquiem ætérnam dona eis, Dómine, et lux perpétua luceat eis. R. Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord; and let perpetual light shine upon them.
V. Requiéscant in pace. V. May they rest in peace.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Pro frátribus nostris abséntibus. V. Let us pray for our absent brethren.
R. Salvos fac servos tuos, Deus meus, sperántes in te. R. Save thy servants, O my God, that put their trust in thee.
V. Mitte eis, Dómine, auxílium de sancto. V. Send them help, O Lord, from thy holy place.
R. Et de Sion tuere eos. R. And from Zion deliver them.
V. Dómine, exáudi oratiónem meam. V. O Lord, hear my prayer.
R. Et clamor meus ad te véniat. R. And let my cry come unto thee.
V. Dóminus vobíscum. V. The Lord be with you.
R. Et cum spíritu tuo. R. And with thy spirit.
Oremus. (Oratio) Let us pray. (Collects)
Deus, cui proprium est miseréri semper et parcere : súscipe deprecatiónem nostram ; ut nos, et omnes fámulos tuos, quos delictórum catena constringit, miserátio tuæ pietátis clementer absolvat. O God, whose nature and property is ever to have mercy and to forgive : receive our humble petitions ; and though we be tied and bound by the chain of our sins, yet let the pitifulness of thy great mercy loose us.
Exáudi, quæsumus, Dómine, supplícium preces, et confiténtium tibi parce peccátis : ut páriter nobis indulgéntiam tríbuas benignus et pacem. We beseech thee, O Lord, mercifully to hear the prayers of thy humble servants, and to forgive the sins of them that confess the same unto thee : that they may obtain of thy loving-kindness pardon and peace.
Ineffábilem nobis, Dómine, misericórdiam tuam clementer osténde : ut simul nos et a peccátis ómnibus exuas, et a pœnis, quas pro his meremur, erípias. O Lord, we pray thee, shew forth upon us thy servants the abundance of thy unspeakable mercy : that we may be delivered from the chain of our sins, and from the punishment which for the same we have most righteously deserved.
Deus, qui culpa offenderis, pœniténtia placaris : preces pópuli tui supplicántis propítius réspice ; et flagélla tuæ iracúndiæ, quæ pro peccátis nostris meremur, averte. O God, who art wroth with them that sin against thee, and sparest them that are penitent : we beseech thee to hear the prayers of thy people that call upon thee ; that we, which have most justly deserved the scourges of thine anger, may by thy great mercy be delivered from the same.
(If the Holy See is vacant, the following Collect is omitted.) (If the Holy See is vacant, the following Collect is omitted.)
Omnípotens sempiterne Deus, miserére famulo tuo Pontifici nostro (Nomen), et dírige eum secúndum tuam cleméntiam in viam salútis ætérnæ : ut, te donante, tibi placita cupiat, et tota virtúte perfíciat. Almighty and everlasting God, we beseech thee to have compassion upon N., our Pope, and by thy mercy govern him in the way of everlasting life : that, being endued with thy grace, he may ever seek those things that are pleasing unto thee, and with his whole strength perform the same.
Deus, a quo sancta desidéria, recta consília et justa sunt ópera : da servis tuis illam, quam mundus dare non potest, pacem ; ut et corda nostra mandátis tuis dedita, et, hóstium subláta formidine, témpora sint, tua protectióne, tranquilla. O God, from whom all holy desires, all good counsels, and all just works do proceed : give unto thy servants that peace which the world cannot give ; that our hearts may be set to obey thy commandments, and also that by thee we being defended from the fear of our enemies may pass our time in rest and quietness.
Ure igne Sancti Spíritus renes nostros et cor nostrum, Dómine : ut tibi casto corpore serviamus, et mundo corde placeámus. Grant, O Lord, we pray thee, that the fire of thy Holy Ghost may in such wise cleanse our reins and our hearts : that we serving thee in pureness both of body and soul may be found an acceptable people in thy sight.
Fidélium, Deus, ómnium conditor et redemptor, animábus famulórum famularumque tuárum remissiónem cunctórum tríbue peccatórum : ut indulgéntiam, quam semper optavérunt, piis supplicatiónibus consequántur. O God, the Creator and Redeemer of all them that believe : grant unto the souls of thy servants and handmaidens the remission of all their sins ; that, as they have ever desired thy merciful pardon, so by the supplications of their brethren they may receive the same.
Actiónes nostras, quæsumus, Dómine, aspirándo prævéni et adjuvándo proséquere : ut cuncta nostra orátio et operátio a te semper incipiat et per te cœpta finiátur. Prevent us, O Lord, in all our doings with thy most gracious favour, and further us with thy continual help : that in all our works begun, continued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy Name, and finally by thy mercy obtain everlasting life.
Omnípotens sempiterne Deus, qui vivórum domináris simul et mortuórum, ómniumque miseréris quos tuos fide et ópere futuros esse prænoscis : te supplices exorámus ; ut, pro quibus effúndere preces decrevimus, quosque vel præsens sæculum adhuc in carne retinet vel futúrum jam exutos corpore suscépit, intercedéntibus ómnibus Sanctis tuis, pietátis tuæ cleméntia, ómnium delictórum suórum véniam consequántur. Per Dóminum nostrum Jesum Christum, Fílium tuum, qui tecum vivit et regnat in unitáte Spíritus Sancti, Deus, per ómnia sæcula sæculórum. Almighty and everlasting God, who hast dominion both of the quick and the dead, who likewise hast mercy upon all men, whom by reason of their faith and works thou hast foreknown : we commend unto thee all those for whom we now do offer our prayers, whether in this world they still be held in the bonds of the flesh, or being delivered therefrom have passed into that which is to come ; beseeching thee that at the intercession of all thy Saints they may of thy bountiful goodness obtain the remission of all their sins. Through our Lord Jesus Christ thy Son, Who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, world without end.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Dóminus vobíscum. V. The Lord be with you.
R. Et cum spíritu tuo. R. And with thy spirit.
V. Exáudiat nos omnípotens et miséricors Dóminus. V. May the Almighty and Merciful Lord graciously hear us.
R. Amen. R. Amen.
V. Et fidélium ánimæ † per misericórdiam Dei requiéscant in pace. V. And may the souls of the faithful departed, † through the mercy of God, rest in peace.
R. Amen. R. Amen.