Category Archives: Beauty

Full and Active Participation: A Pontifical Mass for the Conclusion of the Traditional Pentecost Pilgrimage to Chartres

“Do not invent anything in the liturgy. Let us receive everything from God and from the Church. Do not look for show or success. The liturgy teaches us: To be a priest is not above all to do many things. It is to be with the Lord, on the Cross! The liturgy is the place where man meets God face to face.” – Cardinal Robert Sarah

There was a pilgrimage from Notre Dame to Notre Dame, that is, from Paris to Chartres, through the French countryside.

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I’ve written about this pilgrimage and Chartres Cathedral before here. In that post I write about how the youth are seeking a Church that demands more of them than the Novus Ordo Church of their grandparents. I’ve also posted about a recent restoration project at Chartres here, and a wonderful vintage video on the history and glory of the cathedral here.

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Chartres Cathedral on a quiet day

If you are curious about the pilgrimage, here are pictures of the full three days. They are listed in reverse order–scroll all the way down to see the beginning.

His Eminence Cardinal Robert Sarah showed up on the last day, May 21st, when all the pilgrims had arrived at Chartres:

Cardinal Sarah

And he celebrated Mass in the usus antiquior. Here is the full three hours of that Mass, including the entrance of the laity and all their flags, and all the clergy. It looks like it was quite an event, if that’s the right word:

I admit I’m a sucker for these long vérité videos. I love watching the people, getting a sense the event, its noises, etc. What an amazing Mass. I wish I could have been there, done the whole pilgrimage, etc.

Certainly it makes more sense to celebrate Mass in the Traditional Latin form in Chartres Cathedral, rather than celebrating with the Novus Ordo. A building such as this serves the old Mass better, and the old Mass serves the building better; the beauty, history, and magnificence of each in full cooperation.

From the Cardinal’s homily:

Dear Pilgrims of France, look upon this cathedral! Your ancestors built it to proclaim their faith! Everything, in its architecture, its sculpture, its windows, proclaims the joy of being saved and loved by God. Your ancestors were not perfect, they were not without sins. But they wanted to let the light of faith illuminate their darkness!

He goes on to say:

Today, you too, People of France, wake up! Choose the light! Renounce the darkness!

How can this be done? The Gospel tells us: “He who acts according to the truth comes to the light.” Let the light of the Holy Spirit illuminate our lives concretely, simply, and even in the most intimate parts of our deepest being. To act according to the truth is first to put God at the center of our lives, as the Cross is the center of this cathedral.

My brothers, choose to turn to Him every day! At this moment, make the commitment to keep a few minutes of silence every day in order to turn to God, to tell him “Lord reign in me! I give you all my life!”

So much wisdom in those words! And here is a link to the full text his homily.

The following images (as well as the image at the top of this post) also include quotes, in their original French, from Cardinal Sarah’s homily. I grabbed these from his twitter feed:

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Sufficit tibi gratia mea
“My grace is sufficient for thee”

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L’Arche – The Ark: Considering the vision of Jean Vanier as a model for us all

When we honestly ask ourselves
which person in our lives
means the most to us,
we often find that
it is those who,
instead of giving advice,
solutions, or cures,
have chosen rather
to share our pain
and touch our wounds
with a warm and
tender hand.
— Henri Nouwen

I am fascinated with L’Arch, the community for people with disabilities begun by Jean Vanier, and now spread throughout the world. Such a simple idea. So basic: just listen, be present to each other, celebrate life, touch, care, encourage, do not judge, love, show mercy, bestow grace, joke, sing, etc. Somehow I know the vision, the mission of L’Arche should not be the exception, but it is.

The above documentary gives a great overview and insight to the L’Arche history and mission. The video below gives an intimate portrait into how the L’Arche mission gets lived out in one community, one person’s life, and in response to one profoundly tragic act turned, as it were, on its head because of that mission of love, community, and mercy.

As I watched these videos I got to wondering. Is it not true that all of us have disabilities in one form or another? Certainly we are all sinners — a far bigger handicap that any physical or intellectual ones. We also cary with us all sort of emotional baggage. Some of the scars run deep. Those who have suffered abuse at the hands of others, especially those whom they have trusted and loved, can spend their entire lives working through the damage. We are just all disabled in one way or another. Could it be the picture we see in such an obvious way in L’Arche is truly the picture for us all, for our families, our communities, and the Church? I think so.

And then I wondered about my place of work. It is not a religious community, but a typical place of employment. We have sales and production goals, we have an organizational structure and group dynamics and all the common issues to overcome. I feel we often work hard to keep what is most important to us out of the work place. Rarely do we tell others how we truly feel, what we really think, if we are hurting, struggling, or depressed. I realize this protects us from strife and issues in the workplace that might not be related directly to generating profits. It is common to tell employees to leave their personal life stuff at home. Still, I wonder if the principles of L’Arche can be applied even in the workplace.

With the careful use of language to avoid offending anyone (most people, I assume, would not like being compared to someone with an intellectual disability), what might it look like to adopt and adapt the mission of L’Arche to a business environment, with the understanding that we are, in a sense, overcoming or accepting the disabilities in us all through listening, being present, building trust, and creating a place where disagreement and struggle are necessarily a part of being bonded together? How that might look is, I believe, worth exploring.

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Celebrating in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite at the Pantheon (a.k.a. St. Mary and the Martyrs) in Rome

This Mass was organized by a group of students who call themselves the Tridentini (“A group of Roman Pontifical University students gathering each month for celebrations of the Holy Mass in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.”) and celebrated by l’abbé Matthieu Raffray of the l’Institut du Bon Pasteur in Rome. I believe they are SSPX, but I’m not sure.

I must say I’m curious about the support of the SSPX. Given that it’s in an irregular relationship with the Church, and is thus not in communion with it, I cannot give my support. That many others do makes me wonder. I’m sure some do not know about the issues with the SSPX and the Church, and therefore their conscience is clear. But others do, and yet the pull of the Tridentine Mass is so great that they still go. Again, I wonder. As I’m learning more of Catholic Tradition, including the traditional Latin Mass, and its place and role within our contemporary society and the Church, I’m more and more prone to cut the SSPX  some slack.

Fortunately I have access to the TLM once a month at a nearby parish 15 minutes away, and every Sunday at another parish if I want to drive 20-30 minutes — both in full communion with Rome. My home parish is not yet “TLM,” but may become that in the not-to-distant future. For now it is a reverent and solemn (but not without some of the typically questionable aspects) Novus Ordo parish. Still, I love it. I’m not a hardcore traditionalist, yet.

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From the Sacrament to the Mysteries: A Survey of Classical and Sacred Architecture

Dr. Denis McNamara gave two lectures on Church architecture, sweeping quickly through many aspects of Church design, classical architecture, the meaning of many details that easily get overlooked, and why it matters. The amount of interesting information in these talks is amazing and, I believe, a lot more important than most Christians realize or probably would care to know but should. Denis is also one of the three voices on one of the best Catholic podcasts anywhere, The Liturgy Guys.

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Archbishop Alexander K. Sample celebrated a pontifical Solemn Mass in the Traditional Roman Rite

Archbishop Sample

Archbishop Sample incensing the altar

Archbishop Alexander K. Sample of the Archdiocese of Portland, Oregon was the celebrant at an important Mass on April 28, 2018.

This Mass, held at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington D.C., was done according the 1962 Missal, in Latin of course. This form of the Mass is the Roman Rite, but it was in the Traditional Latin Mass form (rather than the Novus Ordo, or Mass of Pope Paul VI of 1969/70, know my most Catholics today, and also of the Roman Rite). The Traditional Latin Mass is also known as the Extraordinary Form, or usus antiquior (older use). This term, usus antiquior, was mentioned by his Excellency more than once in his homily. One key reason for choosing this form was to commemorate the ten year anniversary since Pope Benedict XVI issued his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. For Catholic traditionalists the motu proprio was a huge event in the recovery of the old Mass and Catholic Tradition, and hence the reason to celebrate.

As I understand it, the Archbishop is not a strident traditionalist, and his homily confirmed that, but he has taken a leading role in promoting the Latin Mass in the United States and elsewhere. Having him celebrate this Mass makes sense. He is also my Archbishop, which makes this rather exciting for me.

This was only the second time since 1969 that Mass has been celebrated in the Traditional Form at the National Shrine. If you did not get a chance to be there or watch it live on EWTN, I’m sure it will be shown again, and eventually made available online. I admit I watched the entire Mass. There was also running commentary, which some might find distracting but I found helpful and not intrusive. I am still very much learning about the Traditional Latin Mass.

Here are some images (screengrabs) from the live EWTN broadcast:

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The Beauty of the Latin Mass

“If they really love Jesus, this is where they’re gonna want to be.”

Once again, here’s another example of looking into the Traditional Latin Mass and those who celebrate it, and finding people loving the beauty, history, transcendence, richness, mystery, challenge, and deep worship they do not find elsewhere.

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The Symptom of Irreverence: Declining Dress Codes and the Modern Worldview

“Irreverence at Mass is not the problem. It’s the symptom of the problem.” – Fr. Dwight Longenecker

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Reverence = Deep respect for someone or something.

Every Sunday at Mass I see a mix of parishioners worshiping. I say “mix” because we come from all walks of life. Some are rich and some poor, some are more educated and some less so, some are there alone and some are with their families, and a variety of ethnicities are represented too. I also see a mix of clothing choices. A few are dressed up in their Sunday best, most are dressed in rather drab everyday clothing, and some come in clothing more suited to playing video games with one’s friends or watching a game on television. I often see team jerseys, untucked shirts, yoga pants, bedhead hair, etc. And some regulars even look like tourists off the bus.

We now live in a slob culture. The way most Americans dress, whether it’s for school, work, or church is fundamentally slobbish. [Full disclosure: I too am a slob.] Look at old pictures and you will see men everywhere dressed in nice shirts, ties, shiny shoes, sport coats and slacks, or suits. Consider the radical 1960’s. That was the time of throwing off convention. Right? Even then you see students so much better dressed than they are today.

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Students protesting during the 1964–65 academic year on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley. Women in dresses and skirts, men in suits and ties.

Even in the mid-1960’s, not all that long ago, and even at a secular university doing secular things, students still believed they had to uphold their dignity as humanbeings in how they dressed.

Or consider this image below from the Apollo Mission Control Center in 1972. Even as recent as this picture was taken I don’t see a single man without a tie. That was routine then.

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I know I don’t need to show any pictures of how people today dress. Untucked t-shirts, shorts, and flip-flops are considered acceptable for many office jobs today, especially in the tech industry. Hawaiian shirts and baggy jeans are even considered appropriate for Evangelical pastors on Sunday morning. Tight and ripped pants, untied tennis shoes, and offensive t-shirt graphics are typical in many schools. I know you’ve seen it all many times.

We take all this in stride. Most people would think it strange to make anything of it. In fact many would defend their slobbishness as not slobbishness at all. We have trouble making wise judgements. We just can’t see it. The dignity of human beings is like the frog slowly dying in the pot of water that has very slowly come to a boil.

Enlightenment Modernism is our worldview. It is the religion of the West. I posit that the gradually increasing and pervasive slobishness of our culture has resulted from the modernist changes to our anthropology. What we believe about what a human being is has everything to do with how what we do with ourselves and others, and with the kinds of cultures we create. As we have devalued man, emerging since the “loss” of human transcendence brought about by the Enlightenment (and probably earlier), and thus the loss of his God-imageness, man has become nothing more than an intelligent animal or a collection of atoms. Therefore, we have nothing to celebrate or uphold when we dress ourselves. We expect royalty to dress like royalty. We are child of the king. But we dress ourselves as slobs.

That this is often expressed at Mass is all the more troubling.

We are not only made in God’s image, we are also sons and daughters of the King. At Mass the King, our Lord and Savior, is truly before us, truly present. We come to worship our God and King. We are subjects in the Kingdom of Heaven. We are Christ’s body. How should we behave? How should we dress?

The real problem is, of course, not how we dress. To riff on the quote from Fr. Longenecker at the beginning of this post, our slobbishness is merely a symptom of the problem. If we Catholics dress like slobs at Mass, and if that is a symptom of a deeper problem, then what is that problem?

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Some Catholics ready for Mass in a different time.

Perhaps we need to ask ourselves if we really believe “this stuff.” Are we really fully Catholic if we say in our actions that we don’t believe some of the Church’s most fundamental, most basic beliefs? Do we believe we are made in God’s image? Do we believe we are God’s children? Do we believe we are now royalty through the saving work of Christ? Do we believe in the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist?

Do we?

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