Category Archives: Mary

The Message of Fatima and the Latin Mass

This lecture is worth the entire two and half hours. And it is a packed two and a half hours. Every bishop should watch it. Every priest too. It is profound and filled with riches to ponder and meditate upon. It is also filled with many challenges. Share it with others. Discuss it.

I am not a conspiracy nut, nor am I a staunch traditionalist, nor am I prone to sectarianism or division, etc, etc, but…

Given the connection between the message of Fatima and the Mass, and given a number of connections and observations Mr. Rodríguez makes, it makes sense that the third secret of Fatima has not been fully revealed. It seems rather clear that the message is very likely a direct challenge to the spirit of Vatican II and the promulgation of the Novus Ordo Mass. And given that the third secret was to be revealed in 1960 and wasn’t, and also by that time the pope and other key individuals in the Church were intent on changing the Mass and bringing about a glorious revolution, no one in leadership (including popes St. John XXIII, B. Paul VI, John Paul I, St. John Paul II, Benedict XVI, and now Francis) has wanted to open that can of worms — whether to cancel the council, or redirect its purpose, or not promulgate a new rite of the Mass, or call all of it into question after the fact. Perhaps they would all feel (or have felt) like they would need to officially abandon the Novus Ordo Mass altogether and they just can’t handle admitting that Vatican II was not the work of the Holy Spirit but of man alone. If this is true, then certainly what we have seen in the Church over the past fifty years are the profound and terrible results of God’s judgement — the list of troubles is staggering. Of course, I cannot say all this is true for I know almost nothing about it, but I wonder, I really wonder. Certainly it is deeply sobering to consider. (And the only “arguments” against this that I’ve come across consists of eye rolling. Thin arguments indeed.)

I worry that a great many cardinals, bishops, priests, and perhaps some popes, from the last half century or more, will end up in Hell because of the destruction they have brought about.

What?!

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Am I way off? Is Mr. Rodríguez wrong? What am I missing?

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Will you be saved?

Will you be saved? This is a profound and fundamental question. Fr. Anthony Mary, C.Ss.R pushes hard on this question and its implications. His talk is powerful, and its content will be almost entirely foreign to Protestant ears.

If I could summarize this talk in the least number of words, I would say it is a warning against the sin of presumption. However, to Protestants it will sound like Fr. Anthony is promoting salvation by works. But we see in Holy Scripture that we are to “work out our salvation,” and that “faith without works is dead,” and that we should “run the race as to win,” etc. It is precisely because we are saved by God’s grace alone that we can work, strive, run, hold fast, put on armor, be holy, and seek perfection with all our might. If we do not care to do this, or if we always have a quick reason at hand declaring we don’t need to, then how badly do we want salvation?

Modern Christianity, certainly born out of the Protestant rebellion, but also part of so much modern Catholicism as well, downplays the seriousness of all this because: 1) Christianity should be about being happy, and thinking of judgement makes us uncomfortable and unhappy; 2) sola fide, a heresy on its own, has morphed into the the “funny inner feeling” that allows oneself to forgive oneself and to declared oneself saved based on one’s feelings about oneself; and 3) we fear that it’s true that faith is actually hard work, and that we are in fact called to holiness and perfection, and that we cannot truly know who will be saved, so we create a Christianity of convenient excuses and social conformity that supports our excuses, which lay the foundation for the sin of presumption. I admit this is an indictment of much of my life.

So… are the examples of the saints mentioned in Fr. Anthony’s talk good pictures of how we should consider our own salvation? I cannot say for certain, but I would rather err leaning towards them than towards modern Christianity’s mostly saintless example.

And how am I doing with this? Terrible. God help me. Queen of Heaven pray for me.

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Full and Active Participation: A Pontifical Mass for the Conclusion of the Traditional Pentecost Pilgrimage to Chartres

“Do not invent anything in the liturgy. Let us receive everything from God and from the Church. Do not look for show or success. The liturgy teaches us: To be a priest is not above all to do many things. It is to be with the Lord, on the Cross! The liturgy is the place where man meets God face to face.” – Cardinal Robert Sarah

There was a pilgrimage from Notre Dame to Notre Dame, that is, from Paris to Chartres, through the French countryside.

Cardinal Sarah quote2

I’ve written about this pilgrimage and Chartres Cathedral before here. In that post I write about how the youth are seeking a Church that demands more of them than the Novus Ordo Church of their grandparents. I’ve also posted about a recent restoration project at Chartres here, and a wonderful vintage video on the history and glory of the cathedral here.

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Chartres Cathedral on a quiet day

If you are curious about the pilgrimage, here are pictures of the full three days. They are listed in reverse order–scroll all the way down to see the beginning.

His Eminence Cardinal Robert Sarah showed up on the last day, May 21st, when all the pilgrims had arrived at Chartres:

Cardinal Sarah

And he celebrated Mass in the usus antiquior. Here is the full three hours of that Mass, including the entrance of the laity and all their flags, and all the clergy. It looks like it was quite an event, if that’s the right word:

I admit I’m a sucker for these long vérité videos. I love watching the people, getting a sense the event, its noises, etc. What an amazing Mass. I wish I could have been there, done the whole pilgrimage, etc.

Certainly it makes more sense to celebrate Mass in the Traditional Latin form in Chartres Cathedral, rather than celebrating with the Novus Ordo. A building such as this serves the old Mass better, and the old Mass serves the building better; the beauty, history, and magnificence of each in full cooperation.

From the Cardinal’s homily:

Dear Pilgrims of France, look upon this cathedral! Your ancestors built it to proclaim their faith! Everything, in its architecture, its sculpture, its windows, proclaims the joy of being saved and loved by God. Your ancestors were not perfect, they were not without sins. But they wanted to let the light of faith illuminate their darkness!

He goes on to say:

Today, you too, People of France, wake up! Choose the light! Renounce the darkness!

How can this be done? The Gospel tells us: “He who acts according to the truth comes to the light.” Let the light of the Holy Spirit illuminate our lives concretely, simply, and even in the most intimate parts of our deepest being. To act according to the truth is first to put God at the center of our lives, as the Cross is the center of this cathedral.

My brothers, choose to turn to Him every day! At this moment, make the commitment to keep a few minutes of silence every day in order to turn to God, to tell him “Lord reign in me! I give you all my life!”

So much wisdom in those words! And here is a link to the full text his homily.

The following images (as well as the image at the top of this post) also include quotes, in their original French, from Cardinal Sarah’s homily. I grabbed these from his twitter feed:

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Sufficit tibi gratia mea
“My grace is sufficient for thee”

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Morning Rosary

Hail Mary, full of grace,
the Lord is with thee.
Blessed art thou amongst women,
and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God,
pray for us sinners,
now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

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Each morning, after my Bible and Catechism reading, I try to pray the rosary. The rosary played an important part in my coming into the Catholic Church. I wrote about it here. I have come to love the rosary. Praying the rosary every morning helps me get through the day. When I go to bed at night, I look forward to praying the next morning — that and my coffee.

Here’s the basic form I follow:

First, if I can, I pray kneeling. I have set up a crucifix, a tryptic of Mary, and a candle on my desk. These things help me focus and get my mind and heart into a more devotional mode. I don’t need them, but I like having them.

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Typically I’m the first one awake in the morning in my house, so it is quiet. I have tended to be very self-conscious in the past, so it was hard to pray if I knew others knew I was praying. Now it’s easier for me. Sometimes my son (now 8 yrs old) walks in on me. I invite him to pray with me. Sometimes he says yes… for a while at least. I need to do a better job of having my family pray together.

Second, I tend to follow the standard rosary structure, with a couple of common additions:

  • I cross myself
  • then I recite the Apostles Creed
  • then I pray the Our Father
  • then I say “For an increase in the virtues of Faith, Hope, and Charity,” then pray three Hail Marys
  • then I pray the Glory Be (I always cross myself when I pray this)
  • then I read the first mystery (I use the Laudate app on my phone to provide these texts, and to remind me of the prayers if I forget the words)
  • then I pray the Our Father
  • then, just before I begin the decade, I ask Mary for her prayers. I have a little notebook that I keep a list of my prayer intentions. They have basic headings: Family, Church, Work, etc. Each heading has below it a number of specific things that I pray for, such as my wife, each of my three children, holiness, the Pope, our parish priests, etc, etc. Each heading group gets one decade of the rosary.
  • After each decade I pray the Glory Be prayer, and then the Oh My Jesus prayer (as asked by Our Lady of Fatima — this I feel is very important)
  • After praying all five decades, I follow with praying the Hail Holy Queen
  • Then I pray the Our Lady of All Nations prayer (which is linked to Fatima)
  • Then I pray the Intercessory Prayer to St. Padre Pio for some specific intentions
  • Then I finish with the St. Michael the Archangel Intercessory Prayer
  • Finally I cross myself and blow out the candle

The whole thing takes about thirty minutes.

By the fourth decade my knees are usually killing me. It’s a struggle to keep going. This will sound funny to contemporary ears, but I want to pray like a Medieval–that is, accepting my suffering as a reminder of the efforts we all have to make towards holiness. So I shift my weight from knee to knee, but I try to stay kneeling. Maybe it will get easier eventually.

As an aside: I have written before on the physicality of faith, the life of prayer, confronting the holiness of God, and what that requires of our bodies. We live in a neo-gnostic or neo-dualistic age where we have lost touch with the fact that the human person is body and soul together forever. We separate “ourselves” from our bodies: we are spirits and our bodies are things. I believe the Medievals, however, knew better the physicality of spirituality and true worship of God. They sought divinization. Most Christians today probably have not even heard of divinization. I think the “spiritual but not religious” thing is driven mostly by this neo-gnosticism/dualism and those ignorant they are neo-gnostics/dualists — where spiritual is equated with the self and thus good, and religion is equated with the body and thus bad or less-than.

My family and I live in a wooden area. If it is light enough outside I will open the curtain and look out at the trees. Sometimes there are deer and wild turkeys making the way through the neighborhood. There was even a bear sighting recently not far from our neighborhood. Rather than a distraction, however, I find their presence reminds me of God the Creator.

I’ve also become fascinated and inspired by the idea of the rosary as a spiritual weapon. I especially like this talk by Fr. Don Calloway. May we all be so enthusiastic for the rosary. My recent post of a lecture series on Fatima and the end times speaks volumes to why we need to all be praying more.

Pray the rosary.

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Our Lady of Revelation: Novena lectures on Fatima, Vatican II, John’s Apocalypse, and the End Times

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I find this series of lectures to be both fascinating and profound. In total it’s about fourteen or fifteen hours long. That’s a lot, but it’s worth taking the time. I believe I know the priest’s name, but I will not post it for it has been asked that people not post post his name. I can say I believe he is a “traditionalist” priest of the FSSP, and thus presents what to many listeners might be a very “conservative” — though I prefer orthodox — perspective. He strikes me as a man of deep faith.

I grew up in an end-times obsessed “Christian” semi-fundamentalist Protestant subculture. I read a number of the popular books on the topic in the 1970’s. Eventually I became disinterested and moved on. Now, as a Catholic, I have a different perspective, and I find myself interested again. And this time, largely by way of my growing interest in our Lady’s appearances in Fatima, and in her message, I am drawn to again to the great plan of God and the salvation of the Church as the centerpiece of creation history.

Other than having read many time the typical end-times biblical prophecies, almost all of the content of these lectures is new to me. I cannot say one way or the other that this priest is truly on target, but I find myself compelled to dig deeper. I will say one could find a lot of doom and gloom in these lectures, but I think there is ultimately a lot of hope. Christ is Lord. God is sovereign. The end is known. Have faith.

[I have gathered together and posted these videos from Sensus Fidelium. I thought there may be value is presenting them as a unit. The priest’s voice is often quiet, headphones help.]

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Archbishop Alexander K. Sample celebrated a pontifical Solemn Mass in the Traditional Roman Rite

Archbishop Sample

Archbishop Sample incensing the altar

Archbishop Alexander K. Sample of the Archdiocese of Portland, Oregon was the celebrant at an important Mass on April 28, 2018.

This Mass, held at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington D.C., was done according the 1962 Missal, in Latin of course. This form of the Mass is the Roman Rite, but it was in the Traditional Latin Mass form (rather than the Novus Ordo, or Mass of Pope Paul VI of 1969/70, know my most Catholics today, and also of the Roman Rite). The Traditional Latin Mass is also known as the Extraordinary Form, or usus antiquior (older use). This term, usus antiquior, was mentioned by his Excellency more than once in his homily. One key reason for choosing this form was to commemorate the ten year anniversary since Pope Benedict XVI issued his motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. For Catholic traditionalists the motu proprio was a huge event in the recovery of the old Mass and Catholic Tradition, and hence the reason to celebrate.

As I understand it, the Archbishop is not a strident traditionalist, and his homily confirmed that, but he has taken a leading role in promoting the Latin Mass in the United States and elsewhere. Having him celebrate this Mass makes sense. He is also my Archbishop, which makes this rather exciting for me.

This was only the second time since 1969 that Mass has been celebrated in the Traditional Form at the National Shrine. If you did not get a chance to be there or watch it live on EWTN, I’m sure it will be shown again, and eventually made available online. I admit I watched the entire Mass. There was also running commentary, which some might find distracting but I found helpful and not intrusive. I am still very much learning about the Traditional Latin Mass.

Here are some images (screengrabs) from the live EWTN broadcast:

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Fatima & the Fifth Marian Dogma

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There are four Marian Dogmas of the Church:

  1. Mary as the Mother of God
  2. The Assumption of Mary
  3. The Immaculate Conception of Mary
  4. Mary’s Perpetual Virginity

Most Catholics and a few Protestants know about, though not always correctly, at least one or two of these dogmas. Catholics should probably know each of them well enough to explain them at a basic level. But, I have to confess, I do not know them as I should. I came into the Church several years ago and, although Mary played a role in that process, I have not spent the time I should to get to know her and to understand the richness of these four dogmas. I am working on that now.

Just recently I have heard there is also a fifth Marian dogma that is not yet an official dogma of the Church. That is Mary as Co-Redemptrix, Mediatrix and Advocate. This dogma is linked to the 1917 Marian apparitions at Fatima, then again in 1945 in Amsterdam, and again in 1973 in Akita, Japan. As far as I can tell, and according to the video below, all are officially recognized apparitions of Mary, but I am not entirely sure. [Please take the time to look these up if you have not heard of them.]

In this talk on Mary and the fifth Marian dogma by Dr. Mark Miravalle, he emphasizes the need, and I would guess the inevitability, of the dogma of Mary as Co-Redemptrix, Mediatrix and Advocate becoming official Church dogma.

I feel compelled at this point to see Dr. Miragalle’s message as worthy of taking seriously, though I am no Marian scholar or expert.

Perhaps the next dogma infallibly declared by the Church will be this fifth Marian dogma. If so, I predict significant outrage from many Protestant corners. But the more I learn about Mary the more I’m so okay with that. She is so much more, in so many ways, than Protestants are capable of grasping given their paltry understanding of Mary and even, I would say, their concepts of the economy of salvation. This, I believe, is a great opportunity for prayer — that the world, and especially Protestants, would come to see Mary for who she truly is and all that she does, and especially how she relates to Christ, His Church, and our salvation. I would not be surprised if the reconciliation of the Church will come through Mary.

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