Tag Archives: community

Beautiful Catholic Churches, Old & New

An EWTN show called Extraordinary Faith did a couple of episodes on new church designs and old church restorations that reflect the traditional patrimony of the Catholic Church.

The information here is great, and shows something of the rebirth and growth in recognizing the timeless and appropriate architectural and artistic designs of those buildings we instantly recognize as churches. Consequently many parishes and religious groups are wanting such buildings again.

I love the level of exposure to these beautiful churches and those who build & restore them this shows brings. There is a great deal of skill and work involved in any traditional Catholic church building. I also love the passion exhibited here for the traditions of the Church.

[An aside: Of course, and as expected, in the “spirit of EWTN” the production quality is serious, thoughtful, and sometimes (unintentionally) humorously amateurish. I would love to see EWTN level up two or three notches with its productions. Perhaps something like Bishop Barron’s Catholicism series, which would be at least a place to start. I’m not just complaining. I used to be a professional television producer and director, so I know a few things about what it takes to make good television, and it’s mostly not a question of money. EWTN too often is caught somewhere between 1980’s professional television and community access television.]

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Filed under Architecture, Art, Beauty, Catholic Church, Church History, Curious, Liturgy, Sacraments, Saints, The Early Church, Theology, Tradition, Video

Corpus Christi processions and wondering about Catholic witness


Detail of a miniature of a bishop carrying a monstrance in a Corpus Christi procession under a canopy carried by four clerics. England (probably Glastonbury)

Below are two vintage newsreels of Corpus Christi processions from many years ago. The first is in Cork, a town in southern Ireland, during WWII. The second is in the bombed out city of Cologne, Germany only two years after the war (notice the significant destruction, yet the magnificent cathedral still stands). Also, in the second video at the very end you will hear reference to Cardinal Archbishop Frings, who was a significant figure in Catholic resistance to Nazism, and later would play a significant role at Vatican II, with a young Fr. Joseph Ratzinger writing his speeches for him.

Many places in the world still have Corpus Christi processions (there are quite a few videos), but not where I live, and I would guess not nearly as often mostly everywhere as once upon a time. Catholicism has waned not least because, in terms of social/cultural/public life, so many Catholics have just given up. What was once considered worth putting in the effort for, is now thought too much work. What was once thought an appropriate public display of the body of Christ in unity, is now considered vulgar or just too frightening. But why complain for lack of a vibrant Catholic culture is one is unwilling to create it?

I say create it. But I don’t know how. Perhaps it begins with taking seriously the Mass and the Real Presence. And that’s a big, life-long project for all of us. Perhaps it begins with more Latin Masses. I don’t know, but I think that is probably true at some level. Love and good works are more important than processions, I know, but then again a solemn Corpus Christi procession just might be an act of love and good works for a local community longing for more than what the secular world can offer. Perhaps we must fight our tendency to feel embarrassed by such public displays. Anyway, I want to help.

What amazing displays of Catholic tradition, faith, and witness.

So I sent an email to my local parish church office asking if there was going to be a Corpus Christi procession this year. I got a one word reply: “No” — without greeting, explanation, a thanks for asking, it has not come up sorry, or even punctuation — literally just the word “No.” Of course the answer sufficed, was clear, and I realize folks are busy and need to get on to other things, so it’s not a big deal.

But somehow, in that short and cryptic answer, I sense a lot of the “bigger picture” of current Catholic witness in our community.

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Filed under Church History, Curious, Evangelism, Liturgical Calendar, Sacraments, Tradition, Video